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The Amazing Price You’ll Pay for a Newfoundland Dog

The Amazing Price You’ll Pay for a Newfoundland Dog

On average, a first-time investment for a Newfoundland dogs can cost between $2000 and $3000 depending on lineage, coat color, and breeder.

One of the key factors related to the higher price has to do with pregnancy and birth problems.

Unfortunately, some Newfoundland dogs have difficulty giving birth due to their small pelvis. As a result, C-sections are frequently required in Newfies to ensure a safe delivery.

Of course, the “cost” of owning a Newfoundland dog goes far beyond what you’ll pay to a responsible breeder. The purchase price is just the tip of the iceberg.

Large breeds have huge appetites! That means you’ll probably be spending a fair amount on dog food. Factor in the cost of pet insurance, grooming supplies, and other incidentals as well.

People who love Newfoundland dogs will tell you they are worth every penny. Frankly, all dogs are worth every penny and more.

This post will help you better understand the origin of the breed, the approximate total cost of owning one, and what you can expect in terms of temperament, exercise needs, and more.

The Origin of the Newfoundland Dog Breed

The Newfoundland dog originated in Newfoundland, Canada. Since the early 1800s. The forefathers of Newfies are said to have been introduced to Newfoundland by European fishermen.

The Newfie is thought to have descended from Great Pyrenees canines and black retrievers. Their exact ancestry isn’t quite that clear. (More on that later).

Newfoundland dogs, known as “Newfies,” were once used to aid in water rescues.

Fishermen counted on these strong and mighty dogs to pluck unfortunate souls from the raging sea. Commercial fishing is a grueling job that requires strength and stamina. And these dogs definitely have that!

Newfoundland dogs are so strong that they were useful in pulling heavy carts to market and hauling nets from the sea.

These working dogs are natural swimmers due to their webbed feet and water resistant coats. In fact, the dog’s lung capacity is so strong that it enables them to swim long distances while saving a drowning victim.

Long-distance swimming requires large webbed paws. Their thick, long tails act as a rudder when they swim.

newfoundland dogs are gentle and sweet Pin

The Big, Burly Appearance of the Newfoundland Dog

People have been known to jokingly call the Newfoundland dog a “bear” due to his large size. In fact, this breed shares some traits with mastiff breeds (for example, the Tibetan mastiff).

The standards of a Newfoundland dog include the following:

Newfoundland Dog Coat Type

Newfoundland dogs have a thick double-coat that protects them from temperature extremes. Their fur is shaggy and long and can be straight or a little curly.

Size & Weight of a Newfie Dog

These muscular dogs have a short snout on a large head supported by a muscular neck. Both the shoulders and the chest are broad.

The male Newfoundland dog is 28 inches tall and weighs anywhere from 130 to 150 pounds (59 to 68 kilograms).

The female Newfoundland dog is about 28 inches tall and can weigh anywhere from 100 to 120 pounds (45 to 54 kilograms).

Personality

The Newfoundland is a gentle and affectionate dog breed that makes an excellent companion. Because these dogs have a natural instinct to protect and assist, they make excellent service dogs and family pets.

Newfoundland dogs are sweet, patient, and devoted to their owners.

A Large Breed Nanny Dog

This breed is well suited for families with children and other pets.

His sheer size may be a bit much for an excited toddler. Otherwise, this breed is known for being a perfect “nanny” dog. They are gentle by nature but will defend their family if there is a real threat.

The best home for a Newfoundland dog is in a rural area or country where there is plenty of room to roam.

Less humidity is better. After all, this giant breed is suited to the cold Atlantic shores of Canada.

Did you know? Nana, the beloved guardian dog in J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan, was named after the breed.

Let Him Swim!

Access to water is very important to Newfoundlanders. Taking him for a swim in the nearest lake or for a romp at the beach would make him a very happy dog.

They are extremely devoted to their owners and make excellent working dogs. This is why this breed is referred to as “the gentle giant.”

International kennel clubs describe the breed as having a sweet and loving temperament.

Excellent with Other Animals

In general, the Newfoundland is good with other animals, but its size can pose a problem if it is not properly trained. That doesn’t mean he’s dangerous. It just means that a huge, playful dog can accidentally hurt another pet or small child.

The Newfoundland is a gentle and affectionate dog breed that makes an excellent companion.

Because these dogs have a natural instinct to protect and assist people, they make excellent service dogs and family pets.

Do Newfoundland Dogs Bark Much?

The Newfoundland dog has a deep bark that may startle you if you’re not ready for it. That said, Newfies don’t bark excessively or for no reason.

Some common reasons for barking could include:

  • boredom
  • wanting something you’re eating
  • trying to get your attention
  • have to go to the bathroom

It’s important to teach your dog good manners from the time he/she is a puppy. This intelligent breed should easily learn basic commands. Like any dog, he will need appropriate exercise and a quality diet.

Exercise is vital for inducing mental and physical fatigue. You’d be surprised how many little behavioral issues can be managed when a dog is exercised regularly.

Dogs benefit from mental stimulation since it keeps them mentally alert. As pet owners, we understand how psychologically drained, bored, and uninspired we can become when we repeat the same routine every day.

Total Costs of a Newfoundland Dog

The price you pay for a Newfie puppy is just the upfront cost. You also have to factor in things like vet visits, vaccines, food, toys, doggy daycare, leashes, collars, and more.

The following offers you an overview of what to expect in the first year:

  • Leash and collar: $40 to $100
  • Harness: $70
  • Food: $120 – $200 per month
  • Behavioral Training: $200 and up depending on trainer
  • Health Insurance: varies by provider. See Wagmo for more information.
  • Toys: $150
  • Microchip: $40 – $50 one time cost
  • Monthly Flea and Tick Prevention $120/month
  • Brush/Comb: $100
  • Crate: $200
  • Bed: $400
  • Initial cost of puppy: $2500
  • incidentals/other

The list above is by no means exhaustive. What you need to buy will depend on your lifestyle. For example, you may not need to send your dog to a doggy daycare.

At the end of the day, however, you can expect to pay well over $2500 that first year of owning a puppy.

The Best Toys to Mentally Stimulate a Newfoundland Dog

Dog owners know that their pets need regular exercise in order to remain healthy and live a long life. However, large-breed working dogs like the Newfoundland also need to keep themselves mentally fit.

We’ve all seen the “hilarious” social media videos where an owner comes home to a destroyed sofa. Plants have been dug up, rugs ripped, and expensive shoes chewed to bits. The problem is, it’s not really funny. It’s a sign of a serious behavioral issue.

Exercise is only one part of the solution. The other part is engaging your dog in mental stimulation.

Think F.I.T. (Fetch, Interactive, and Tug) Toys

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Best Fetch Toys for Newfoundland Dogs

Fetch toys are easy to find, but finding one that’s just right for a large breed may not be so easy. My go-to for tough, durable toys come from the Kong lineup.

Although the Newfoundland dogs don’t have the same muscular jaws as a pitbull, he still needs something that’s going to last.

KONG Wubba Toys

The Kong Wubba toys come in 3 different colors and are made to withstand the pull of a giant breed. If you’ve ever had or seen Kong toys before, you’ll understand just how long they last.

The Kong Wubba is a classic toy perfect for tossing, fetching, and tugging. Got a strong arm? Hang on! Dogs love it when you engage them in play. This toy helps form that strong bond between you and your dog while keeping him/her mentally and physically engaged.

Bonus: There are no small parts that can come off. This is a tough, durable toy.

KONG Extreme Tire Toy

I’ve seen dogs at the off-leash dog park with these and they seem to be a big hit. They’re durable and provide the perfect chewing experience.

The cool thing is that you can fill them with treats! Want to keep your dog busy for a while? Fill this tire with his favorite treats and hand it over.

Reviews for this toy indicate that it is extremely durable. One reviewer claims it’s “unbeatable” and is thrilled that her large breed dog hasn’t been able to destroy it.

The Kong Tire Toy is definitely built for large dogs who love to chew. You really can’t go wrong with this.

Best Interactive Toys for Newfoundland Dogs

This suggestion isn’t a toy per se, but it is very useful for people who have to leave their dogs at home for whatever reason. We all have to work for a living and not all of us can work from home.

If that sounds like you, you might be interested in keeping an eye on your dog while you’re away. Petcube offers the perfect opportunity to watch your dog while you’re away. The best thing about it is that you can say Hi! to your dog?

Petcube

Imagine sitting at work and then looking at the camera only to discover your dog is about to start tearing the house apart. Just call him over and watch how interested he becomes! Tell him what a good boy he is and send him a treat….all virtually from your place of work.

Petcube products come in a variety of styles. You can get just the Petcube camera, the Petcube Bites 2 Lite, Petcube Play 2, or the Petcube Bites 2.

My Pick?

I would get the Petcube Bites 2 for a large breed dog. It has a wide-angle view and HD video for monitoring while away.

Enjoy premium two-way audio to hear and speak to your dog! It’s as if you’re on the phone with your dog. He/she will love the sound of your voice when you have to be at work.

The best part (other than the fact that you can talk to your dog and listen to him snore or bark) is that it comes with a build-in treat dispenser. Yes, that’s right, you can toss treats remotely. You can even control the amount of treats and the distance it throws.

Best Tug Toys for Newfoundland Dogs

In addition to the tug toy mentioned above, there are countless other options.

Mammoth Tug Toy 5 Knot Dog Rope XL

This one doesn’t look very exciting, but it does keep dogs entertained. You’ll need a strong arm for this tug-of-war game.

Free shipping when you shop at Chewy. Comes in X-Large and XX-Large. Perfect for Newfoundland dogs.

What to Expect in the First Year – Newfoundland Puppies

Newfoundland dogs can gain up to 100 pounds in their first year of life and require a lot of food. Their metabolism slows after that initial growth spike.

Getting your first Newfoundland puppy can be a life-changing experience.

Physical Growth

Puppies grow quickly in the first nine months then slow down as they move into adolescence. At that point, your growing puppy will fill out with some muscle and fat.

Maturity

Puppies reach adolescence around the age of seven months, sexual maturity around the age of ten to eleven months, and full mental maturity around the age of two years.

Behavioral Training

There are many great books and videos to help you with behavioral training. Start teaching your dog basic commands as soon as possible.

Newfoundland dogs are big dogs (even as puppies). Unless you want your breakfast muffins scarfed from the table (it’s happened!), it’s best to start training as soon as possible.

Vaccines

There is a core set of vaccinations required for every dog including the rabies shot. Check with your veterinarian about the best time to book these appointments. Remember, they’re vital for your health’s wellbeing and can even save lives.

Exercise Requirements of a Newfoundland Dog

Newfoundlanders need 30 to 60 minutes of exercise and activity every day. A daily walk should be supplemented with additional free play and strength training.

High-impact or overly strenuous exercise can cause joint pain. Overly strenuous exercise should be avoided in puppies. This is because their bones and joints develop very quickly and in the process become vulnerable to injury.

Newfoundlanders are known for being lazy and prone to becoming couch potatoes. Make sure they exercise every day to maintain a healthy weight and keep their muscles and joints in good shape.

Because most Newfoundlands are water dogs, provide them with opportunities to swim whenever possible.

Include mental stimulation, such as puzzle toys or scenting games, to avoid boredom.

Appropriate Exercise for Newfoundland Puppies

Newfoundland puppies grow quickly, which can put their bodies under a lot of strain. Their growth plates do not close completely until they reach the age of 18 months.

Long walks are not necessary for a puppy, and off-leash play is the best form of exercise.

Swimming is a great low-impact exercise. For puppies, mental stimulation is essential, and it can exhaust them just as much as physical activity. Keep in mind that Newfoundland dogs have a thick and heavy coat, which can lead to overheating in the summer.

A weighted vest or dog backpack can be used to add extra resistance to the walk. Don’t use more than 10% of their body weight to over pushing your dog too far.

Grooming a Newfoundland Dog

All dogs require some type of grooming and the Newfoundland is no exception. There’s nothing too extensive about it, however. A good brush once or twice a month should be enough to keep your dog’s fur free from matting.

About the Newfoundland Dog’s Coat Type

Newfoundland dogs have two coats, a dense undercoat and a top coat of longer hairs. These longer hairs are known as “guard hairs”.

The breed has an oily undercoat that helps to keep extremes of heat and cold away from your puppy’s skin.

Outer Coat Brushing

Newfoundland dogs have a double coat that is water-resistant. Look for de-matting combs and brushes designed specifically for giant breed dogs.

Brushing your dog’s fur on a regular basis is a must. This will help avoid fur matting and tangles, Brushing once per week will also help stimulate the skin’s oil glands while removing dead hair.

Bathing

Bathing isn’t required as frequently. A single bath every month or two should be fine. Most dog owners wait until a situation arises where their dog absolutely needs to be washed. Unless you have the space, you may want to bring him/her to the groomers for this.

Bath time is messy time with Newfoundland dogs. Groomers typically have the space and the right equipment.

Newfoundland dogs (surprisingly) are not heavy shedders. You can expect some shedding during spring and fall. This is because the dog’s coat is preparing for the change in weather and climate.

Potential Health Problems of a Newfoundland Dog

All dogs are at risk of certain health problems. In some cases, one health problem (diabetes, for example) can lead to an onslaught of secondary programs.

The Newfoundland dog is no different. Keep in mind that the list of potential health problems below does not mean your dog will get all off these. In fact, he/she may not get any of the following conditions.

Health conditions include:

  • elbow dysplasia
  • hip dysplasia
  • bloat
  • eye disorders/disease
  • cardiac disease
  • endocrine disorders
  • food allergies
  • skin allergies

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A Note About Bloat

Newfoundland dogs are more prone to bloating, also known as GDV (Gastric Dilatation Volvulus). To reduce the risk of this, do not feed your Newfie right before or after exercise.

Bloat can quickly become a life-threatening emergency. Be sure to read more about the risks of bloat and how to prevent it.

It’s also a good idea to feed your Newfoundland from a raised bowl or on an elevated surface to help with digestion and avoid GDV.

A reputable breeder ensures the parents come from good stock free of major disease through extensive health testing.

Newfoundland Dog Breeders-Finding the Right One for You

If you’re in the market for a Newfoundland dog, do a little research when looking for breeders.

In order to find a trustworthy breeder, inquire about their dogs’ health, temperament, and overall quality.

Information on nutrition, grooming, training, socializing, and veterinary needs should be included in the discussion.

The following breeders were discovered at the American Kennel Club Marketplace. We trust the American Kennel Club but cannot make any claims as to the reputation of the following breeders.

Always do your research.

Monark Puppies – Judy Speak Miller

Puppies are from AKC Registered parents. They ask that you do your research to be sure that this breed will fit into your lifestyle.

  • All applicable health screens have been performed on the sire and dam.
  • Health guarantee available for puppies.
  • Will provide a written bill of sale detailing responsibilities for the buyer and seller.
  • Will take back puppies that do not work out. Please research first.

Purchase Price:

$2200 – $2700

Location:

Missouri, USA

Avalon Bey Newfoundlands

This breeder has had a successful career breeding, showing, and competing in working events over the past 20 years and more.

Member of the Colonial Newfoundland Club

Member of the South Eastern Newfoundland Club

  • AKC registration application provided
  • AKC National Breed Club Member
  • AKC Specialty Club Member
  • Dogs compete in AKC events

Purchase Price:

Unknown. Contact breeder.

Location

Vale, NC

Newfoundland Puppies – Breeder

Puppies are from AKC registered parents and can also be registered with the AKC.

  • AKC registration application provided
  • AKC National Breed Club Member
  • Dog compete in AKC events: conformation

Price:

$2500 – $3000

Location:

Middleton, OH

For a list of all AKC registered breeders, visit the American Kennel Club Marketplace.

Beware: How to Spot a Puppy Mill

There are a few red flags to be aware of when looking for your Newfoundland puppy. Make sure you’re allowed to visit and observe the living environment.

Look for:

  • sanitary conditions
  • adequate access to food and water
  • small litters – you want to make sure there is no overbreeding
  • how soon the breeder will allow you to take the puppy home. Puppies should be at least 8 to 12 weeks old.
  • if the breeder is more interested in your money than the dog, run.

SUMMARY

The Newfoundland is a powerful dog with a big and gentle heart. This intelligent breed is perfect for families who are able to provide appropriate exercise.

Finding the right dog for your family’s circumstances should be your highest priority. Dogs are a huge responsibility and they only stay puppies for a very short time.

Consider how much space you have, how much you can honestly exercise your dog, whether the breed fits your budget, and whether you can keep up with the grooming and maintenance.

If you’re looking for a big dog that will fit in nicely with your family (including other pets), the Newfoundland dog is an excellent choice.

Works Cited

Petfinder. www.petfinder.com, https://www.petfinder.com/dog-breeds/newfoundland/. Accessed 14 Apr. 2022.

Animal Corner. animalcorner.org, https://animalcorner.org/dog-breeds/newfoundland-dog/. Accessed 14 Apr. 2022.

helloBARK! hellobark.com, 12 May 2021, https://hellobark.com/dogs/newfoundlands/.

Welton, Michele. Newfoundlands: What’s Good About ’Em, What’s Bad About ’Em. www.yourpurebredpuppy.com, https://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/reviews/newfoundlands.html. Accessed 14 Apr. 2022.

Hill’s Pet Nutrition. www.hillspet.com, https://www.hillspet.com/dog-care/dog-breeds/newfoundland. Accessed 14 Apr. 2022.

Hill’s Pet Nutrition. www.hillspet.com, https://www.hillspet.com/dog-care/dog-breeds/newfoundland. Accessed 14 Apr. 2022.

Barkercise. barkercise.com, 5 May 2020, https://barkercise.com/newfoundland-exercise-needs/.

Jeremy. How To Groom A Newfoundland [Step by Step Owners Guide]. peteducate.com, 21 Sept. 2020, https://peteducate.com/how-to-groom-a-newfoundland/.

Spend On Pet | Optimise Your Pet Expenses. spendonpet.com, 18 Mar. 2020, https://spendonpet.com/newfoundland-dog-cost/.

All Famous Faqs. allfamousbirthday.com, 14 Apr. 2022, https://allfamousbirthday.com/faqs/are-newfoundlands-good-dogs/.

Newfoundland Dog Breed Hypoallergenic, Health and Life Span | PetMD. www.petmd.com, 20 Mar. 2009, https://www.petmd.com/dog/breeds/c_dg_newfoundland.

Barkd App. www.barkd.com, 30 Mar. 2021, https://www.barkd.com/how-to-spot-a-puppy-mill/.

Breeding Business. breedingbusiness.com, 29 Mar. 2021, https://breedingbusiness.com/how-to-breed-newfoundland-dogs/.

My Brown Newfies. mybrownnewfies.com, 21 July 2016, https://mybrownnewfies.com/2016/07/21/newfoundland-puppy/.

Complete Care Guide for Newfoundlands » Info, Tips, & More. www.dog-learn.com, https://www.dog-learn.com/dog-breeds/newfoundland/care. Accessed 14 Apr. 2022.

The Spruce Pets. www.thesprucepets.com, 17 Jan. 2022, https://www.thesprucepets.com/breed-profile-newfoundland-1117983.

Veterinarians.Org. www.veterinarians.org, 23 Aug. 2021, https://www.veterinarians.org/mental-stimulation-for-dogs/.

My Brown Newfies. mybrownnewfies.com, 11 May 2016, https://mybrownnewfies.com/2016/05/11/understanding-dogs-double-coat/.

Newfoundland Club of New England | Promoting the Newfoundland Dog Breed since 1969. www.newfclubne.org, 30 Nov. 2016, https://www.newfclubne.org/breeders-list/.

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